Pre Employment Screening: Applicant Tracking Solutions With This Feature

When hiring new employees, background checks are essential. More specifically, pre-employment background checks are used by many companies before they even consider hiring someone. The screening process for a potential employee will give you the appropriate information you need to see if they are the right fit for you and your company.

There are many bullet points under the pre-employment screening process that a recruiter professional might want to consider. The first is a credit report. Some employers, for one reason or another, decide to hire a candidate based on their credit report – but they can not just obtain one freely. According to the Fair Credit Reporting Act, before an employer obtains a credit report they must get written consent from the candidate. A copy of the credit report must be given to the applicant and they have the right to challenge the report. Bankruptcies, which can also apply to a pre-employment screening can appear on a candidate or employee's credit report. However, discriminating or hiring based on a person who has filed for bankruptcy is prohibited under the Federal Bankruptcy Act.

Education is often a factor when it comes to the hiring process. Even so, there are regulations when it comes to obtaining school records such as transcripts. Along with some state laws, the Family Educational Rights and Private Act are to remain confidential and require permission from the student.

Another facet of the pre-employment screening process are criminal records. A candidate's criminal past can also help inform a recruiting professional's decision. However, there are regulations that vary from state to state when it comes to hiring a candidate based on their criminal history so it would be wise to consult with a law professional so that everything is compliant.

The use of lie detector test in a pre-employment screening process is not allowed under the Employee Polygraph Protection Act. There are some exceptions such as security guard services, alarm system professionals, businesses that utilize armored car services and many who are involved in the pharmaceutical business.

Medical records also play a role in pre-employment screening . Again, an employer can not discriminate against a potential employee based on a persons physical or mental disability. This is prohibited by the Americans with Disabilities Act. However, an employer can ask about a candidate's ability to do the tasks of the job they are applying for. For example, if the applicant is applying for a job that requires heavy lifting, the employer can ask if they do have the ability to perform tasks that require heavy lifting.

There are many ins and outs when it comes to the pre-employment screening process. By knowing what to screen for and how to screen for it, a business can make their hiring process effortless.

The Business Of Home Video

The technology of home video has it's roots in the mid 1970's with the advent of Sony's u-Matic video cassette system. What? Never hear of that? It's because it never found it's market as a home medium because it was too cumbersome and expensive. It went on to become the standard for industrial videos.

In the early 1980's, Beta and VHS were introduced as home video formats, with VHS taking a rapid lead. Even then, it appears mostly to time shifting TV shows, since the separate cameras and recorders with interconnecting wires and short battery life made portable video a chore.

By the mid eighties, camcorders had come to market, combining the camera and recorder in one compact unit (for it's day). Still rather large for most people to cart on vacation, entrepreneurs, myself included, quickly discovered a commercial use for the devices – filming weddings and corporate events.

In 1985 I opened my first video production business in Connecticut and within two years I quit my full time job in the computer engineering business and went full time into video. Back then, if you showed up on time, could hold the camera steady and keep it in focus, you could make a steady income in the video business. Camcorders were still rather expensive, and properly editing videos required equipment and talent beyond the realm of the average person.

By 1990, cameras became smaller, easier to use, and less expensive. Computer based non-linear editing was still the realm of the broadcast world, but more affordable tape based editing systems allowed event videographers to hone their finished products. No longer could simple basic skills keep you in business, you had compete with new video businesses in your market and polish your skills as an editor. Still, as the analog tape-to-tape duplicating process used for editing clipped away the undesirable footage, it caused an unavoidable loss of image clarity.

Digital video camcorders hit the consumer market in 1995. This allowed much clearer looking videos, and editing digital tape to tape avoided the loss of image quality associated with analog video editing. VHS was still the mainstay for the finished product, but now that product had the sharpness of a first generation VHS tape, and not a ragged edged copy as in the past. Computer based editing was still expensive, but was beginning to make it's way to the mainstream event video producers.

By the year 2000, cheaper, faster and less expensive computers had hard drives large enough to store feature length videos at reasonable cost. Non linear editing became the choice of nearly every video business. Clients were expecting far more from their finished product, and DVD was becoming the preferred medium for delivery of the final video. Even though videos were not yet high definition, the DVD made video look much better than VHS. More and more new event video companies were popping up as the prices of camcorders and computers continued to fall while their quality and ease of use went up. 2000 was a pinnacle year for wedding videos, as brides lined up in droves to have their weddings at the turn of the century.

By 2005, the camcorder had become so small, so easy to use, and high definition video produced such a great result it seemed that event video people were on every street corner. Anyone with two thousand dollars could start a video business and produce quality results, at least from the technical perspective. The real competition was beginning to come not only from other video businesses, but from former clients as well. Instead of continuing to pay a professional one to two thousand dollars to record their wedding video, some clients were buying their own camcorders for five hundred dollars and letting a friend or relative shoot the video.

Small, pocket sized high definition camcorders, high definition video in camera phones and free editing software on cheap, off-the-shelf PCs have diminished the client's perceived value of the professional video by 2012. The expectation of clients is that that video professional must Be able to replicate what the client sees in the movie theater or on television. Trouble is, studios still spend hundreds of thousands or more on lighting, sound and talent. Now matter how good home equipment is, or how polished the skills of a professional event videographer, a client's stingy three hundred dollar budget is not going to buy the results that clients see on TV. Not willing to pay thousands, many clients are satisfied with You-Tube style video clips taken with the camera phones of their friends – provided it's free. And a professional can not compete with free and stay in business.

Today, as a result of the amazing small, inexpensive and high quality camcorders and free editing software, the video business is far more challenging for the event professional. There is still something a professional can offer that all your friend's camera phones can never match. That is a video that truly tells your story or deliveries your corporate message as it should be, with the look and finish close to that of an independent film. In the end, it is the knowledge and experience that are worth the cost. You can not buy that with an iPhone in the hands of a close friend.

Training For a Marathon – A Primer

Do you have aspirations for running a marathon? Even an Olympian runner would agree that training is the most crucial part of the game. While training for a marathon, it is important that you prepare properly. If you do not pay attention to proper training, you are doomed to fail. If you have already tried it and found it too challenging then sure you need to get with the program.

As is generally the rule, to get better at something, you need lots of practice and commitment. Brilliant people from all walks of life have just this one secret – practice. Training basically is a mixture of practice, expertise on part of the instructor and commitment on part of the trainee, all brought together to form a winning combination. In addition, trainees in many fields, especially sports, benefit from their natural skill and talent. The good news about running is that it does not require any special skills. One just needs to be able bodied and in good health and the rest can be left to the training regimen.

Training for a marathon requires you to constantly push your body to gain more in terms of stamina and endurance. This requires you to proceed in a consistent manner. Haphazard training will not only fail to give the desired results but will also be a source of discouragement because your body will deteriorate rather than improve. Let us discuss a few guidelines that can be helpful when training for a marathon:

Firstly, you must develop training routines that place minimal stress on your body. Running puts pressure on your joints, ligaments, tendons, muscles and nervous system. Some degree of slow steady running is necessary to develop the stamina required for marathons but it is imperative to not overdo it.

Secondly, you need to develop other areas of your body that will support your long distance runs. These organs are the heart, the lungs and the muscles. Healthy heart and lungs ensure adequate oxygen supply is maintained to your tissues, and developed red muscles (through aerobic exercise) Ensure that you do not tire easily.

Lastly, you need to read the signs of your body during training for a marathon. Do not torture your body. Gradually make your training harder and harder and take a day of rest and / or lighter training every now and then to allow your body to recover fully.

Important Things To Consider When Choosing A Hotel

Choosing a hotel to stay in is one of the most important decisions to make when planning a trip. This can be difficult, especially when embarking on a journey to an unfamiliar destination. A perfect choice can help make the trip a more exciting experience while a poor choice could ruin the trip altogether. Below we will discuss five major factors to consider before booking a hotel.

Price

Choosing a hotel that suits your travel budget is a key factor to consider. This would help you save some cost if well thought out. Hotel prices are affected by location, hotel type (luxury or budget hotel) and also by the facilities. With the right research you can get a good bargain in a top hotel (especially when they offer discounts).

Location

So many questions would come to mind when considering the hotel’s location. Is it close to the venue of your primary reason for travelling? Is it in a secure location? What is transportation in the area like? What are the tourist attractions around the area? Are there any medical centres around? All these questions and more need to be properly answered to make sure you are close to everything you would need throughout your stay.

Facilities/Amenities

This is one very important factor to consider because it helps you understand what facilities are available at the hotel compared what the ones you need. Therefore helps you avoid unpleasant surprises. For instance, it would be discouraging to find out that the hotel does not have Wi-Fi and internet connection, especially for those on a business trip. How about finding out that you might need to share the bathroom or some other conveniences.

Value

Getting true value for money spent can only be done by comparing prices of the different hotels simultaneously. You can ask for discounts and other lucrative offers ad save some money. Apart from considering the price of the hotel, you can also research about value added services like laundry/dry cleaning, internet access, extended room services, etc.

Reviews

Reading through the experiences of others who have stayed at any of the hotels you are considering would help to authenticate the quality and standard of the hotel. Though you can’t solely rely on this factor, most times these reviews are honest and vital resources needed when deciding between hotels. These reviews help you answer questions like are the hotel rooms clean, are the air conditioners working, how friendly is the customer service and whether the food at the restaurant is any good.

If you put these five factors into consideration before booking a hotel for your next trip, am sure you would not be disappointed with your choice.